Low Impact Development Photo Database

 

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Summary of LID Structures

Structure Type

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Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement

 

Carmen Harrington

Engineering Project Manager

Greenwood Village

(303) 708-6133

PICP-04

Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement - 6060 South Quebec St, Greenwood Village, CO

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Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement

2008

 

PICP-03

Denver Wastewater

Denver, CO

  • PICP installed next to porous asphalt demo for comparison
  • Installed May 2008
  • Pavers can accommodate heavy loads
  • Joints between pavers and material under pavers allows water to flow downward.

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Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement

 

Michelle DeLaria

(303) 455-6277

PICP-02

Arvada, CO

  • Permeable interlocking concrete pavement uses layers of open-graded aggregate to provide a stable vehicle surface and allow stormwater infiltration.
  • From bottom up: subbase, 12” depth of #4 size aggregate, 4” depth of #67 size, 2” depth of 3/8th fracture aggregate setting bed, pavers
  • Sand and geotextile fabric between the aggregate layers are not used
  • For light vehicle or pedestrian use, the 12” depth of #4 aggregate may be reduced unless needed for stormwater capacity.
  • The depth of the #4 aggregate can also be increased to receive run-on from adjacent impervious areas.
  • See Meza Construction - Permeable Paver System Article for project photos and information

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Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement

 

 

PICP-01

302-306 Main Street

Breckenridge, CO

  • East side of Main Street;
  • Borgert Aqua-Bric pavers;
  • ADA-rated block;
  • Use aggregate layers for stability and to infiltrate stormwater;
  • Use fractured - not rounded - aggregate;
  • Install from bottom up:  12" of 1.5-3-inch (#4) stone then 4" of 1-inch (#67) stone and 2" of 3/8th-inch (#8) chip;
  • For pedestrian use, the top two layers of #67 and #8 stone can be used;
  • For vehicle use and full stormwater infiltration capacity (100-year detention), the full 18" of aggregate layers must be used.

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Porous Asphalt

2008

  PAP-02

2000 West 3rd Ave

Denver, CO

  • Denver Wastewater
  • Constructed Spring 2008
  • Demonstration area partnered with Urban Drainage and Flood Control District for testing and monitoring
  • Excavated existing asphalt area
  • Imported open-graded aggregate

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Porous Asphalt

2005

Kevin Roberson

Kimley-Horn & Assoc

Suite 1050

950 17th St

Denver, CO 80202

(303) 228-2300

email

PAP-01

3301 N Tower Road

Aurora, CO

Walmart Experimental Supercenter

  • Designed by Cahill and Associates with site design by Kimley-Horn

  • Turner Construction was the general contractor

  • Constructed 2005

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Pervious Concrete

June 2008

Angela Hager, PE

Street Maintenance Engineering

City and County of Denver

(720) 865-6780

email

PCP-04

Auraria Campus Lot K

Denver, CO

  • Installed June 2008
  • Cross section:
    - 6" Pervious Concrete
    - 8" coarse aggregate (Recycled concrete was used as the coarse aggregate)
    - 1" sand buffer (10% of the sand was replaced with crushed glass
    - Geotextile
    - 6" sand (10% of the sand was replaced with crushed glass
    - Geotextile
    - Underdrains and coarse aggregate
    - Liner

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Pervious Concrete

2007

 

PCP-03

2033 S Colorado Blvd

Denver, CO

  • Commercial parking lot at NW corner of Colorado Blvd and Evans
  • Installed Spring 2007
  • Photos taken May 2008

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Pervious Concrete

2005

Kevin Roberson

Kimley-Horn & Assoc

Suite 1050

950 17th St

Denver, CO 80202

(303) 228-2300

email

PCP-02

3301 N Tower Road

Aurora, CO

Walmart Experimental Supercenter

  • Designed by Kimley-Horn with Turner Construction as the general contractor

  • Constructed 2005

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Pervious Concrete

2004

 

PCP-01

6220 E 14th Avenue

Denver, CO

Safeway parking lot

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"Green" Parking Lot

 

 

GPL-01

2880 International Circle

Colorado Springs, CO

Pikes Peak Regional Building Department

 

  • LEED-NC Silver Certification

  • Asphalt for driving lanes and reinforced gravel for parking places and overflow parking.

  • Small landscaped detention areas instead of raised medians

  • incorporated swales and porous pavers.

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Porous Landscape Detention

 

 

PLD-06

Highlands Ranch Town Center

Highlands Ranch, CO

  • Several PLDs and sand filters on this commercial site

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Porous Landscape Detention

 

 

PLD-05

2100 South Colorado Blvd

Denver, CO

  • RTD Parking Lot

  • Colorado Station at NE corner of Colorado and Evans

  • Designed by PTG

  • Constructed 2006

  • General Contractor: Kiewit
    Subcontractor: Meza Construction

  • As-built PLD design

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Porous Landscape Detention

 

 

PLD-04

2260 Baseline Rd

Boulder, CO

Land and Water Fund of the Rockies

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Porous Landscape Detention

 

 

PLD-03

350 S Havana St

Aurora, CO

Lithia Colorado Chrysler Jeep

 

This structure failed for the following reasons:

  • Bluegrass sod was used instead of native grasses and plantings.

  • Compost was substituted for peat without regard to the difference in porosity and accounting for the fact that the compost may have still been 'hot'

  • Inadequate mixing of the soil and compost

  • Inadequate undrain system

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Porous Landscape Detention

2006

Michelle DeLaria

(303) 455-6277

PLD-02

8500 W Bowles Ave Littleton, CO

Wells Fargo Bank parking lot

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Porous Landscape Detention

 

 

PLD-01

1400 S Havana St

Aurora, CO

Aurora West Target parking lot

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Grass Buffer

2004

 

GB-01

5850 Stetson Hills Blvd

Colorado Springs, CO

Wendy's at Ridgeview Commercial Center site.

Designed by: JR Engineering, LLC.

The size of the development is: 1.06 acres.

 

Maintenance comments are as follows:

  • The facility was designed to comply with the City of Colorado Springs - Drainage Criteria Manual, Volume 2 (DCM).

  • Grass Swales (GS) were proposed for this site due to the poor porosity of the soils in the area.

  • This, along with the fact that no underground drainage facilities exist in the immediate area of the site, resulted in the determination that a swale system was the most appropriate BMP to use.

  • In order to maximize the pollutant removal efficiency of the GS, the swale slopes were held to 0.7%.

  • Rock check/drop structures were placed at regular spacing along the GS to keep swale velocities slow, promoting sediment removal and dissolved pollutant uptake.

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Bio Swale

 

 

BS-02

Highlands Ranch 118 Backcountry

  • Integrated stormwater management - stormwater as a site amenity

  • Concept and design - Jim Wulliman from Muller Engineering

  • Open water channel swales instead of storm sewer

  • Flush curbs

  • Detention areas stimulate natural hydrology and habitat

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Bio Swale

2005

Kevin Roberson

Kimley-Horn & Assoc

Suite 1050

950 17th St

Denver, CO 80202

(303) 228-2300

email

BS-01

  • Wal-Mart Experimental Supercenter

  • Designed by Kimley-Horn

  • Constructed by Turner Construction

  • Ten Inch perforated pipes under the adjacent Porous concrete and asphalt sections and structures with weirs and orifices connect to the bio swales in order to equalize and use the entire three-acre basin for infiltration.

  • Constructed in 2005

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Sand Filter

 

Erik Nelson

SF-02

  • June 2008

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Sand Filter

 

Erik Nelson

SF-01

  • Incorrect Sand was used in this location and has accelerated clogging

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Green Roof

 

Brian Tewey

Boulder County Administrative Services

County Architect Division

2020 13th St

Boulder, CO 80302

(303) 441-3957

(303) 441-1718 fax

GR-04

2470 Broadway

Boulder, CO

  • Boulder County Alcohol Recovery Center

  • Funded by Boulder County Sustainability Budget

  • No irrigation - hand watered

  • Modular system with 1' x 2' pregrown interlocking trays

  • Plants and materials provided by LiveRoof system www.liveroof.com

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Green Roof

2008-2009

Lisa Benjamin

Evo Design

(970) 875-0845

GR-04

Private Residence

Steamboat Springs, CO

  • Extensive Installation

  • 5" of lightweight media over a Carlisle green roof drain system, root barrier, and a hot applied roofing membrane.

  • Will be planted in May 2009 with a vegetated carpet grown by Sempergreen consisting of 6-8 different sedum varieties.

  • Pictures provided by Lisa Lee Benjamin at Evo Design and Andy Creath, Green Roofs of Colorado, LLC.

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Green Roof

 

 

GR-03

1416 Platte St

Denver, CO

  • REI - Flagship Store

  • Green roof covers the parking garage

  • Photos taken by Michelle DeLaria 5-2008

  • Seeking design and construction information for posting

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Green Roof

1970's

Steve Jordan

(303)  772-9368

GR-02

13975 Elmore Rd

Longmont, CO

  • Private residence

  • Earthen berm/green roof

  • Constructed late 1970's

  • 2400 sq. ft. and costs about $15.00 a month to heat/cool home

  • Reinforced roof with 8" to 12" of soil on top of approximately 5 layers of felt matting and tar

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Green Roof

 

 

GR-01

1595 Wynkoop St

Denver, CO

EPA Region 8 Headquarters

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Level Spreader

2000

Jeff Cheng

(303) 739-7300

LS-02

18601 E Sports Park

Aurora, CO

Installed at Aurora Sports Park

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Level Spreader

1989

Jeff Cheng

(303) 739-7300

LS-01

Iliff Ave

Aurora, CO

Installed in Horseshoe Park on Iliff Ave between Chambers Rd and Buckley Rd

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Mountain Stormwater

 

Michelle DeLaria

(303) 455-6277

MSW-03

Rock Ring - Pine Junction, CO

  • Reduce erosion from concentrated culvert discharge

  • Rock ring slows concentrated flow and allows infiltration

  • Use when culvert discharges onto a meadow and in area with higher sediment loads

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Mountain Stormwater

 

Michelle DeLaria

(303) 455-6277

MSW-02

Flow Diffuser - Kittredge, CO

  • Reduce erosion from concentrated culvert discharge

  • Infiltrates small storm flows and helps restore sheet flow

  • Use seepage pit rings or other container

  • Place large rock around structure

  • Generally self cleaning, however recommended for areas with low sediment load

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Mountain Stormwater

2006

Michelle DeLaria

(303) 455-6277

MSW-01

Rock Checks - Happy Hill Rd, Evergreen, CO

  • Jefferson County roadside ditch.

  • Happy Hill Rd is 1/4 mile north of the intersection of Hwy 73 and N Turkey Creek Rd.

  • Installed 2006

  • Reduces runoff and ditch scour

  • Creates terraced ditch with increased stability and reduced maintenance needs - Key rocks into sides of ditch.

  • Top of rock check must be below the level of the road

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Extended Detention Basin

 

 

EDB-01

Extended Detention Basin - Grant Ranch, CO

  • Detention with forebay and micro pool

  • Forebay provides surface sediment trap for easier cleaning

  • Micro pool provides 4-ft deep water pool

  • Micro pool provides bird and dragon fly habitat for natural mosquito control

  • Site sampling conducted by Wright Water Engineers - Grant Ranch Stormwater Quality Management Program

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This database is compiled and maintained by the CASFM Stormwater Quality Committee.  Please submit photos and summaries for other structures that may be added to this list. Also send additional information about existing structures in this database to Michelle DeLaria at: mdelaria@udfcd.org 

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